Potty Tools

Potty Tools: Clean Up After Your Dog With These Messy-Free Solutions

Potty Tools: Clean Up After Your Dog With These Messy-Free Solutions

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Dog Poop Catcher

Sure you can scoop it, you can bag it, you can even compost it – but can you catch it? Yes, you can! A dog waste catcher allows you to catch the poop before it hits the ground.

These units usually consist of a collapsible frame that folds out to create a circular shape onto which you can wrap a plastic bag. Simply put it beneath your dog as she’s doing her stuff and wrap it up when she’s done. If you want to go a little lower-tech, you always can use a paper plate.

Port-a-Potty

If you live in an apartment or have a terrace or small yard (or if you just want your pooch to potty in a specific area), try a portable potty. All kinds of these potties are cropping up on the market. You can even get them with real sod-replacement service.

Some models come with fake grass and a litter system beneath them; some include a built-in fire hydrant and white picket fence; others have clear walls for males that like to life a leg when the tinkle.

When choosing a potty, it’s critical that you choose one to match the size of your dog. Even if you have a small space, try not to skimp on size. Your medium-sized dog may not want to use a Chihuahua-sized patch of grass!

Litter Box Decisions

Small-dog owners may be interested in litter training their dogs, and indeed, this has proven successful for some. Here are a few things to consider when deciding whether or not to use a litter box.

1) Do you have a small dog? It is much easier for a small dog to use a litter box than a large dog, and to scoop out their smaller feces.

2) If you have a small dog, do you travel a lot with her? If so, litter boxes are great ways to avoid extra stops, and they provide your dog with a familiar place to eliminate once you arrive at your destination.

3) Do you have a health reason for wanting to litter train? Is your mobility restricted in any way by physical limitations that would make it easier for you to litter train your dog than to walk her?

4) Do you live in a city – in an apartment on a high floor, which makes it difficult for you to get your dog outside in time to eliminate?

If the answer to any of these questions is yes, consult your veterinarian to make sure there are no health roadblocks for your dog – then get to training!

Hi there! I’m a bike messenger by day, aspiring actor by night, and this is my website. I live in Los Angeles, have a great dog named Jack, and I like piña coladas. (And gettin’ caught in the rain.)

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The information shared on this site is for information only. It does not take the place of professional advice from your pet’s healthcare provider.

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